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Which 70's horror film is your favorite?



TCM


Exorcist


Tobe Hooper

Before becoming a filmmaker, Tobe Hooper, a native of Austin, Texas, spent the 1960s as a college professor and documentary cameraman. In 1974, he organized a small cast that was made up of college teachers and students, and then he and Kim Henkel made The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (1974). This film changed the horror film industry. Hooper based it upon the real-life killings of Ed Gein, a cannibalistic killer responsible for the grisly murders of several people in the 1950s. Hooper's success with "The Texas Chainsaw Massacre" landed him in Hollywood and it remains a horror-film classic. Hooper rejoined the cast of "Texas" and with Kim Henkle again for Eaten Alive (1977), a gory horror film with Mel Ferrer, Carolyn Jones, William Finley, and Marilyn Burns (who played the lead in "Chainsaw"). The film centered around a caretaker of a motel who feeds his guests to his pet alligator. Also in the film was Robert Englund, whom Hooper helped advance his career and worked with him again in the future. "Eaten Alive" also won many awards at Horror Film Festivals.

Hooper was assigned to the Film Ventures International production of The Dark (1979), a science-fiction thriller. After only three day, he was fired from the film and replaced with John Cardos. Instead, Hooper had greater success with Stephen King's 1979 mini series Salem's Lot (1979) (TV). In 1981, Hooper directed the teen-slasher film The Funhouse (1981) for Universal Pictures. Despite its success, "The Funhouse" was a minor disappointment. In 1982, Hooper found greater success when Steven Spielberg hired him to direct his production of Poltergeist (1982) for MGM. It quickly became a top-ranking major motion picture, despite some differences that were resolved by Spielberg himself taking over Hooper's directing duties.

"Poltergeist" was perhaps a greater success than "Texas Chainsaw Massacre," but it was three years until Hooper found work again. He signed a three-year contract with Menahem Golan and Yoram Globus's Cannon Group, and directed more films, including Lifeforce (1985), the minor remake of Invaders from Mars (1986), and the disappointing sequel The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2 (1986). Since then, Hooper's career has gone downhill. He also directed two more Robert Englund films, Night Terrors (1995) and The Mangler (1995), in 1995 and he has also directed numerous horror television sitcoms. Recently, Hooper was asked to write a new script for Michael Bay's remake of Hooper's original Texas Chainsaw Massacre, which was released in 2003.

Honored with many awards for his films and achievement in the horror genre, Tobe Hooper is truly one of the "Masters of Horror" (2005). Before becoming a filmmaker, Hooper--a native of Austin, TX--spent the 1960s as a college teacher and documentary cameraman. He organized a small cast of teachers and students and made The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (1974). It changed the horror film industry and became an instant classic. Even today it remains on virtually every list of top horror films of all time. Hooper based it upon the real-life case of Ed Gein, a cannibalistic killer responsible for the grisly murders of several people in the 1950s (although in Wisconsin, not Texas). Hooper's success with "Chainsaw" landed him in Hollywood. Rex Reed said, "It's the scariest film I have ever seen." Leonard Maltin wrote, "While not nearly as gory as its title suggests, 'Massacre' is a genuinely terrifying film made even more unsettling by its twisted but undeniably hilarious black comedy." It is in the Permanent Collection of the Museum of Modern Art, and was officially selected at the Cannes Film Festival of 1975 for Directors Fortnight.


It has been called "grisly," "sick," and "perverse," as well as "raw," "unshakeable," and "the movie that redefined horror." It was attacked by churches, banned by governments, and acclaimed by only the bravest of critics. It stunned audiences worldwide and set a new standard in movie terror forever. In 1974, writer-producer-directorTobe Hooper unleashed this dark, visionary tale about a group of five young friends who face a nightmare of torment at the hands of a depraved Texas clan. Today it remains unequaled as a landmark of outlaw filmmaking and unparalleled in its impact as perhaps the most frightening motion picture ever made.

The Starlight, a decrepit hotel run by Judd (Neville Brand), receives few customers. Perhaps it’s the remote location in the Texas bayous. Perhaps it’s the owner's violent mood swings. Or perhaps it’s the man-eating crocodile in the backyard. But one dark steamy night finds the Starlight visited by a runaway prostitute (Roberta Collins, Death Race 2000), a young couple (Marilyn Burns and William Finley) and their child (Kyle Richards, Halloween), a dying father and his daughter (Mel Ferrer and Crystin Sinclaire), and sex-obsessed Buck (Robert Englund, A Nightmare on Elm Street), all of whom will experience an unforgettable night of terror at the hands of Judd and his pet croc.

A New England village is plagued by vampirism in this blood-curdling shocker based on the bestselling novel by Stephen King, directed by Tobe Hooper (Poltergeist) and starring David Soul, James Mason, Bonnie Bedelia, Lew Ayres and Ed Flanders.

On her first date with Buzz (Cooper Huckabee, True Blood), Amy (Elizabeth Berridge, Amadeus) disobeys her father and goes to the carnival with Richie (Miles Chapin, Hair) and Liz (Largo Woodruff), but their first date may end up as their last. After witnessing a murder, the four terrified teens are trapped in the maze of the funhouse and stalked by a real monster, a horribly deformed killer who lurks among the freakish exhibits waiting to butcher them one by one. Funhouse also stars Sylvia Miles (Midnight Cowboy) and Kevin Conway (in three roles) and features special makeup designs by Academy Award winner Rick Baker (An American Werewolf In London, Ed Wood).

Craig T. Nelson, JoBeth Williams. A Steven Spielberg classic places a typical suburban family in harm's way when beings from the other side" infiltrate their home and scare the bejeezes out of them with a series of bizarre and terrifying events. Celebrate the 25-year-old nightmare for the Freeling family with no let up in the sheer horror it invoked as when it was first released! 1982/color/114 min/PG/widescreen.

A mission to investigate Halley's Comet discovers an alien spacecraft. After a deadly confrontation the aliens travel to Earth where their seductive leader begins a terrifying campaign to drain the life force of everyone she encounters. Her victims in turn continue the cycle and soon the entire planet is in mortal danger.

From the director of the original Texas Chainsaw Massacre, this ghastly and hilarious (Variety) sequel descends into your deepest, darkest fears as a wacked-out lawman goes after human meat-cutters with his own high-octane chainsaws in a horrific showdown with the legendary leatherface and his entire cannibalistic family.

Enter the extraordinary, supernatural world of Steven Spielberg with all 24 episodes of the complete first season of "Amazing Stories." Created by and featuring some of the greatest talents in Hollywood, these original tales delivered a groundbreaking and imaginatively unique show every week. Digitally remastered and presented in Dolby 5.1 surround sound for the first time ever, the DVD release also includes 20 minutes of deleted scenes. The 24 episodes from the 1985-86 season include performances by Kiefer Sutherland, Charlie Sheen, Tim Robbins, John Lithgow, Kevin Costner and many more.

Every year thousands of people move to Hollywood to pursue their dreams. Some succeed. Some go home. Others just… disappear. There are bad apartments – rats, bad plumbing, crazy landlords - and then there’s the Lusman building. Something evil lives deep in the building itself, something linked to the architecture itself… something that needs to keep killing to stay alive.

A Tobe Hooper Film. DVD Features include: Theatrical Trailer, Unrated Director's Commentary, Unrated behind the scenes featurette with Tobe Hooper, "Inside the Graveyard". When the Doyle family moves to a small town in California, they plan on starting a new life...perhaps a strange choice, seeing as this new life entails running the long-abandoned Fowler Funeral Home and cemetary. The locals fear the place, and there are whispers around town that not only are the grounds haunted, but that the Fowler boy, who wore a burial shroud to hide his hideously deformed face, still lives in one of the tombs there. The Doyles discover all too soon that the gossip is true. Someting lurks beneath the Fowler estate--someting that raises the dead from long-forgotten graves...something that feeds upon death itself.